Miami Vice (1989) – To Have and to Hold, and Miami Squeeze

The final season of Miami Vice continues this week as we bid farewell to a couple of characters. To Have and to Hold was written by William Conway, and debuted on 10 February, 1989. The episode sees the final apparance of Sonny Crockertt’s (Don Johnson) ex-wife Caroline (Belinda Montgomery) and his son, Billy (Clayton Barclay…

The New World (2005) – Terrence Malick

Terrence Malick brings his arthouse visual style to the tale of Pocahontas (Q’Orianka Kilcher) and Captain John Smith (Colin Farrell) in the next title on the What Else to Watch list in DK Canada’s The Movie Book, following its recommendation of Aguirre, The Wrath of God. Joining Kilcher and Farrell in the tale of the…

Underworld (2003) – Len Wiseman

Kate Beckinsale kicks ass and looks stunning doing it as she plays Selene, a death dealer, or vampire, in Underworld, the next recommendation from DK Canada’s highly enjoyable Monsters in the Movies by legendary director, John Landis. There has been a war raging around humanity for centuries as vampires and werewolves, or death dealers and…

Space: 1999 (1976) -Catacombs of the Moon, and Space Warp

Apparently evangelicals (of a sort) continue to exist in space when they rear their head in this episode of Space: 1999 written by Anthony Terpiloff. It first aired on 25 November, 1976. Patrick Osgood (James Laurenson), one of the engineers on Alpha, is looking for teranium in the depths of the moon. Just a few…

This Sporting Life (1963) – Lindsay Anderson

Richard Harris headlines the next film in the What Else to Watch list featured in DK Canada’s The Movie Book, following the recommendation of Saturday Night and Sunday Morning. Harris stars as Frank Machin, a miner who eventually finds success on the rugby field, something he’s wanted for a long time. He lodges in the…

Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) -Karel Reisz

DK Canada’s The Movie Book moves onto the ‘angry young English man’ section of cinema with Saturday Night and Sunday Morning. Albert Finney stars as Arthur, the stereotypical angry young man. He works hard at the factory all week, drinks hard on the weekend and is involved with two different women. He walks a fine…

Dracula Has Risen From the Grave (1968) – Freddie Francis

I’m starting a new movie book today, and this one should be a lot of fun. DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies by John Landis is going to bring me a lot of joy I think. There is going to be good films, bad films, schlock, gore, and general awesome-ness. The first section of the…

So Long, and Thanks For All the Fish (1984) – Douglas Adams

So I felt it was time to check in with the gang from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy again, and dove into book four of the trilogy. This one seems a bit shorter than the previous tale, and to my chagrin, Ford Prefect is barely in it, Marvin makes only an appearance, and Zaphod…

The Trap (2015) – Melanie Raabe

  There is an immediacy to Melanie Raabe’s debut novel, The Trap, which sees its English release this week, via House of Anansi Press here in Toronto. Translated from German the captivating tale draws the reader into the world that she has created, much as her character, author Linda Conrads, is drawn into the situations…

Magnum, p.i. (1987) – Pleasure Principle and Innocence… A Broad

  Things get a little weird in Hawaii this week with the Pleasure Principle. This one was written by Jay Huguely and aired 14 October, 1987. For some strange reason, Thomas (Tom Selleck) is acting like Higgins (John Hillerman) and Higgins is acting like Magnum. Thomas, still recovering from his injuries (including being partially blind…

Way Out West (1937) – James W. Horne

  I dive into some family titles now with the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film book, and I hesitate to admit this, this was my first experience with a Laurel and Hardy film. The only real complaint I have about the film is that it is too short, clocking in at just over…

The Time Machine (2002) – Simon Wells

  My foray into the Sci-Fi Chronicles book continues as we cath up now with the cinematic work inspired by the works of HG Wells. I’ve previously reviewed two of the titles recommended in the book, the 60s version of The Time Machine, and the Nicholas Meyer thriller Time After Time. So it was time…