How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) – Ron Howard

I’m very particular about my holiday specials when it comes to television and movies. My treasured titles are very select, and I get very put out when a new one is thrust upon me. I love A Charlie Brown Christmas, Emmett Otter, John Denver & The Muppets, The Muppet Family Christmas (I like my Muppets),…

The Ghoul (1933) – T. Hayes Hunter

Horror legend Boris Karloff takes on the zombie genre in the next film in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies, although with the introduction of Egyptology into the story, one could make an argument that it could fall into the mummy genre as well. Karloff is Professor Morlant an aging, and dying Egyptologist. He’s been…

Die, Monster, Die! (1965) – Daniel Haller

There are more mad scientist films to explore as I dig deeper into DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies book, and Die, Monster, Die! is the next one up. Which is weird, because I didn’t really notice a scientist in the film. Based very loosely on H.P. Lovecraft’s Color Out of Space, the film plays…

The Mummy (1932) – Karl Freund

Somehow in my exposure to the Universal Monsters, and classic films I had missed this Boris Karloff classic that allowed the Mummy (Karloff) to join the ranks of such classic monsters as Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolf Man, The Invisible Man and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. Now, thanks to DK Canada’s The Movie Book,…

House of Frankenstein (1944) – Erle C. Kenton

  Boris Karloff headlines in this classic Universal film as I continue my exploration of Frankenstein on film for Sci-Fi Chronicles. Karloff plays Dr. Gustav Niemann, who, alongside his hunchback companion Daniel (J. Carrol Naish) escape from prison. It seems they were imprisoned due to experiments that were similar to those¬†conducted by ¬†Frankenstein, and hey,…

Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Rowland V. Lee

I’m diving into a new book to partner with the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film one, I’m adding Sci-Fi Chronicles to the list, it covers books (including comics) as well film and television, the first subject is Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. I’ve previously reviewed the original film and its first sequel, Bride of, as…

Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

  Bride of Frankenstein picks up right where the first one ended with the angry townspeople and trying to burn out the monster. After most of the townsfolk amble away in a post-mob funk we learn that both the monster and Henry Frankenstein (Henry?? Really?? I know I harped on that last time, but wow,…

The Old Dark House (1932)

This was a romp! Encased in gothic trappings, this film is one of the lighter ones that have been suggested to me by 101 Horror Movies. It’s not quite madcap, but I love a lot of the dialogue, in fact when it gets to this point, I think you can quite safely call it banter….