Road to Bali (1952) – Hal Walker

The comedic entries continue in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies book as I delve into one of the iconic Road movies of Bing Crosby and Bob Hope, co-starring Dorothy Lamour. When George (Crosby) and Harold (Hope) end up unemployed in their chosen art, show-biz, (because of some fraternisation with a couple of local sheilas)…

Never Give A Sucker An Even Break (1941) – Edward F. Cline

DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies continues to make a monkey out of me with their chapter on monstrous apes as it doles out another comedic entry. That being said, I’m not a W.C. Fields fan. His character is always the same, and is extremely unlikable as far as I’m concerned. He’s an alcoholic, and…

Moonlighting (1987) – A Trip to the Moon, and Come Back Little Shiksa

With the shark firmly behind them, Moonlighting Season Four got underway on 29 September, 1987 in A Trip to the Moon written by series creator Glenn Gordon Caron. David (Bruce Willis) and Maddie (Cybill Shepherd) have been together for four weeks, and both of them seem to have different opinions on what and where the…

Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) – Joe Dante

Is the mad scientist behind the camera or in front of it in this, the next film to be recommended by DK Canada’s highly enjoyable Monsters in the Movies book? Joe Dante, the film’s director has always seemed wonderfully mad, his love of Looney Tune cartoons, and wacky humor always makes his films enjoyable from…

Irma la Douce (1963) – Billy Wilder

Today, I continue with the What Else to Watch list in DK Canada’s The Movie Book following the recommendation of Some Like It Hot. So I dug into another Billy Wilder film that I had often heard of, but never seen Irma la Douce. Starring Shirley MacLaine in the titular role and the hilarious Jack…

The House (2017) – Andrew Jay Cohen

Releasing to blu-ray and DVD today from Warner Brothers, is the latest comedic effort from Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler. Somewhere in this film, there is the potential for something really funny, but far too often the dialogue is pushed past the point of hilarity to absurdity, and the story itself could have played as…