The Spy Who Loved Me (1962) – Ian Fleming

The tenth James Bond book, and the ninth novel, is this week’s 007 Book Shelf entry, and it’s a bit of a unique creation. It’s a small, almost non-event in the life of secret agent James Bond, and is told from the first person perspective of the heroine of the tale, French-Canadian Vivienne Michel. Recently…

Licence to Kill (1989) – John Glen

Timothy Dalton’s second and sadly final outing as James Bond is this week’s 007 feature to buddy up with the Bond Book Shelf. This one came along at an important point in my life. It was my last few weeks in Bermuda, I was in love for the first time with my first girlfriend (Tracey)…

Humanoids From The Deep (1980)- Barbara Peeters

A creature feature is the next title that I dive into for DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies book. I remember seeing this poster when I was growing up, and was intrigued and troubled by it. And being anxious about horror films at that age, I definitely didn’t get around to seeing it for a…

Dizzy Detectives (1943) – Jules White

I have always enjoyed the Three Stooges shorts. There’s not a time in my memory when they didn’t make me laugh out loud. I can remember Sunday mornings spent watching the marathon on television, or going to the base theatre in Borden to watch collections growing up. So when I saw that they were the…

Live and Let Die (1954) – Ian Fleming

Ian Fleming’s second James Bond book finds its way to my book shelf this week as I delve into the character’s literary history as well as all the 007 films I haven’t covered for the blog. It’s an enjoyable novel, although it is steeped in way too much racist language and descriptions as Bond goes…

Hard Boiled (1992) – John Woo

The Directory, filling out the last section of DK Canada’s marvellous The Movie Book, brings me a 90s action classic. One that set the standard for Honk Kong cinema, and found fans all over the world with its style of balletic violence, beautifully crafted shots, and fantastic set pieces. Not to mention, the exemplary Chow…

Dragonslayer (1981) – Matthew Robbins

Vermithax Perjorative. Was there ever a better name for a dragon ever? DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies book brings me this classic film from ’81 as I continue my exploration of the dark chapter on dragons and dinosaurs. Boasting some fantastic creature effects, Vermitax may be the best looking dragon to ever be presented…

Dry Summer (1963) – Metin Erksan

The Directory in DK Canada’s The Movie Book is continuing to supply exceptional films from around the globe, and today’s entry is a Turkish film that strikes a familiar chord about possession and greed. The story follows a pair of brothers, Osman (Erol Tas), and Hasan (Ulvi Dogan), a pair of farmers that are caught…

Star Trek: Voyager (2001) – Repentance, and Prophecy

Captain’s log: stardate 54474.6 Robert Doherty pens this episode from a story he developed with Micheal Sussman. It first aired on 31 January, 2001, and tried to bring some big topics up for discussion. This is something that Trek tends to do pretty well. This time around, the Voyager comes to aid of a damaged…

Meshes of the Afternoon (1943) – Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid

As I explore the final pages of DK Canada’s immensely informative The Movie Book, I’ve moved into the last section of this catalogue of films. Herein lies another title from The Directory, a selection of titles that are exceptional but didn’t make the cut for the main body of the text. Meshes of the Afternoon…

Un Chien Andalou (1929) – Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali

The Directory in DK Canada’s The Movie Book is going to provide me with a number of films I’ve never seen, or a chance to revisit old friends. Having said that I’m not sure where Un Chien Andalou fits. True I had never seen the entire short, running twenty-one minutes, but I feel that everyone…

The White Ribbon (2009) – Micheal Haneke

I’m finishing up the main body of DK Canada’s exceptional The Movie Book, and Haneke’s The White Ribbon is a fantastic film to wrap up the main section of the book. Set a few short years before the First World War, this Golden Globe winning film is a somber, thoughtful affair on sins, youth, tradition,…