The Sweet Hereafter (1997) – Atom Egoyan

Atom Egoyan’s heartbreaking, and powerful film (something I was fortunate enough to be able to tell the director in person) is the next stop in DK Canada’s The Movie Book. Based on the novel by Russell Banks, which Egoyan adapted as well as directed the film features great performances by Ian Holm, Sarah Polley, Bruce…

Smile of the Wolf (2018) -Tim Leach

Getting its Canadian release this month from Anansi Press, Smile of the Wolf by Tim Leach is a powerful Icelandic tale set against a backdrop of ice and revenge, where honor is the only law. Kjaran is a poet, and spends winters in the homes of those who would take him and hear his songs…

Space: 1999 (1977) – The Immunity Syndrome, and The Dorcons

This is it, the last week of Space: 1999, and while some of it has been very good, and a number of stories showed some promise, the series, as a whole, has not weathered the decades as well as it could have. The penultimate episode is The Immunity Syndrome (not to be confused with the…

The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower (2007) – Stephen King

Stephen King’s fantastic opus comes to its pic conclusion this week in the most epic way possible, and it’s a stunning read. Picking up where the previous installment left off, the ride doesn’t let up until the very last page as Roland Deschain and his ka-tet are reunited across worlds. We join up again with…

Miami Vice (1985) – Nobody Lives Forever, Evan, and Lombard

The final trio of episodes that wrap up season one are up for viewing this week starting with Nobody Lives Forever. Written by Edward Di Lorenzo this tale first aired on 29 March, 1985. Detective Sonny Crockett (Don Johnson) has his hands full with a new romance, but it may end up distracting him from…

Miami Vice (1985) – Milk Run, and Golden Triangle: Part 1

It’s back to Miami for another flashback to the 80s, as Crockett (Don Johnson) and Tubbs (Philip Micheal Thomas) continue to do their part to stem crime in the seedy world of drugs, arms, prostitution, and vice. Milk run was written by Alison Hock and first aired on 4 January, 1985. Staking out the airport,…

Life is Beautiful (1997) – Roberto Benigni

Walking away with Oscars for Best Foreign Film, Best Original Score, and Best Actor in a Leading Role for Benigni, Life is Beautiful is the next recommendation from the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film book following my screening of Schindler’s List. In this partly whimsical tale that touches on true humour while facing…

Schindler’s List (1993) – Steven Spielberg

The next title on the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film as I return to the historical section of the book is Spielberg’s heart-wrenching, anguish filled look at the Holocaust through an adaptation of a true story. Over the course of three hours, this black and white film, with only significant and poignant uses…

Bicycle Thieves (1948) – Vittorio De Sica

It had to happen sooner or later. Working my way through two film books at the same time, one of the titles would have to synch up… And as I continue exploring the fantastic The Movie Book from DK Canada, and delve into the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film book, this is the…

Doctor Who (Peter Capaldi) – Dark Water and, Death in Heaven

Series Eight of the Time Lord’s travels comes to a dramatic conclusion in this two part finale, in which we see the return of the Cybermen, and the reveal of who Missy (Michelle Gomez) is. Dark Water written by Steven Moffat, first aired on 1 November, 2014. Clara (Jenna Coleman) and Danny (Samuel Anderson) open…

The Daylight War (2013) – Peter V. Brett

Digging into the third book of The Demon Cycle by Peter V. Brett has been long overdue, but it was very much worth the wait. After the climactic conclusion of the previous instalment, not to mention some of the revelations, the characters are left in some strange places. The novel picks up shortly after the…

A Monster Calls (2011) – Patrick Ness

It’s been a long time since a book has reduced me to tears, but Ness’ powerful, and beautiful young adult books, A Monster Calls has done just that. Inspired by an idea from Siobhan Dowd who passed before she could tell it herself, the story is a singular experience that is heartbreaking in its truth…