Thunderball (1961) – Ian Fleming

The ninth book, and eighth full novel,in Ian Fleming’s James Bond 007 series is up this week. And this one is a bit of a special case. It was originally concocted as a screenplay, and early editions gave sole credit to Fleming, whereas future editions, much like the film(s) that would later be developed from…

Licence to Kill (1989) – John Glen

Timothy Dalton’s second and sadly final outing as James Bond is this week’s 007 feature to buddy up with the Bond Book Shelf. This one came along at an important point in my life. It was my last few weeks in Bermuda, I was in love for the first time with my first girlfriend (Tracey)…

Diamonds Are Forever (1956) – Ian Fleming

The fourth James Bond adventure by Ian Fleming is on my book shelf this week, and I dug into it eagerly. Despite some troubling moments of racism, 007’s literary adventure in this book is damned enjoyable, and you can see a number of themes and locales survived the jump to the big screen with Sean…

Live and Let Die (1954) – Ian Fleming

Ian Fleming’s second James Bond book finds its way to my book shelf this week as I delve into the character’s literary history as well as all the 007 films I haven’t covered for the blog. It’s an enjoyable novel, although it is steeped in way too much racist language and descriptions as Bond goes…

Casino Royale (1953) – Ian Fleming

Some twenty years ago, my sister gifted me with six of Ian Fleming’s original James Bond adventures. First printings from the Macmillan Company, these wonderful little hardcovers were in great condition but sans books jackets. I hadn’t read any of the Fleming Bonds since my early teens, when I was in the midst of discovering…

Live and Let Die (1973) – Guy Hamilton

007 is back, and he’s the next recommendation from the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film book. Roger Moore debuts as secret agent James Bond in this 1973 update of Ian Fleming’s character. It also delves a little into blaxploitation, and features one of my favourite Bond Girls, Jane Seymour as Solitaire. Marrying drugs…

Dr. No (1962) – Terence Young

It’s back to the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film book to check in with the Action genre, and consequently, I get to spend some tine with secret agent 007. Bond, James Bond. Sean Connery brings Ian Flemings’s spy to the big screen in Dr. No, the first recommendation for the previously reviewed Goldfinger….

The Fly (1958) -Kurt Neumann

  The Sci-Fi Chronicles brings me another classic, one I am actually ashamed to admit I have never seen, but I was such a huge fan of the Cronenberg remake that I didn’t want to sully my love of it. This version, lacking Cronenberg’s body horror, is the original incarnation, has a script by Shogun’s…

Solo (2013) – William Boyd

  Bond is back in this continuation of the original Ian Fleming novels featuring 007. It’s 1969, and James Bond has just celebrated his 45th birthday when he is given his latest assignment by M. And thus begins an adventure that is far more in line with the literary Bond than his big-screen interpretation, that…

Casino Royale (2006) – Martin Campbell

  James Bond returns to the 101 Action Movies list with Martin Campbell’s second Bond film, the first being GoldenEye. It amazes me that he can direct a Bond film so well, arguably two of the best, while anything outside of that, his films are less than stellar. Anyway. With Casino Royale, we get the…

Diamonds Are Forever (1971) – Guy Hamilton

Sean Connery returns as Ian Fleming’s James Bond 007, his last official appearance as James Bond. Never Say Never Again is a remake of Thunderball which was released by Warner Brothers, so it doesn’t count as canon. Sorry. This entry on the 101 Action Movies list follows James as he works to foil S.P.E.C.T.R.E.’s latest…

Thunderball (1965) – Terence Young

  007 is back in his biggest adventure yet and the 101 Action Movies brings me one of my favorite Sean Connery Bond films. For me, this one has it all, exotic locations, scuba diving (something I haven’t done for years, but still love), Connery being suave and cool, banter with Q (Desmond Llewelyn) and…