Project: Hail Mary (2021) – Andy Weir

I loved Andy Weir’s The Martian, and happily dug into Project: Hail Mary (I still need to read Artemis), and was completely wowed by it. I haven’t had this sense of wonder and sense of discovery and exploration since I read Clarke’s Odyssey and Rama series. Ryland Grace, former biologist turned teacher wakes up and…

Dark City (1998) – Alex Proyas

As much as I enjoy The Crow, Dark City may be my favourite Proyas films, it combines two of my favourite genres, the film noir and science fiction and delivers something intelligent, engaging, and fantastically put together. And yet, I hadn’t watched this one in forever, but of course, when it was time for a…

Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983) – Lamont Johnson

Produced by Ivan Reitman, a score by Elmer Bernstein, a cast that includes Micheal Ironside, Ernie Hudson, Molly Ringwald, (an uncredited) Harold Ramis, and Deborah Pratt, Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone is an odd little b-movie science fiction film that tried to cash in on the re-blossoming fascination with 3D back in the early…

Event Horizon (1997) – Paul W.S. Anderson

I have always dug this movie, since I saw it on the big screen in 1997. I love the cast, I love the score (Micheal Kamen), and I love the ideas at work in this science fiction horror film, and like all fans of the film I lament the fact that we will never get…

My Science Project (1985) – Jonathan B. Beteul

When I was growing up in Bermuda, my fellow Canuck, Sean lived across the street of Cedarcraft Lane, and he and his brothers always seemed to be renting odd movies that I had never heard of – they were well into their b-movie science fiction before I came along. And one weekend, I was able…

Tobor the Great (1954) – Lee Sholem

DK Publishing brings me another mechanical menace from its highly enjoyable Monsters in the Movies book. This time around, he’s not so much a menace as he is menace. Very much a product of its time, the 50s, this film, dramatically set in the future of the day after tomorrow, it’s a charming, if not…

Gog (1954) – Herbert L. Stock

DK Books’ Monsters in the Movies beings me another mechanical menace, as I am introduced to Gog, in this 1954 science fiction film, that despite it’s terrible pacing, story, and acting hints at tech that is currently in use today, like stealth planes, solar energy, and malware. We are introduced to Dr. David Sheppard (Richard…

Lovecraft Country (2016) -Matt Ruff

This week I dove into Matt Ruff’s brilliantly entertaining Lovecraft Country, which takes all the things you love about a good Lovecraft story; otherworldly horror, science fiction mixed with horror, and some other familiar horror tropes, the creepy doll, the haunted house, and deliver it without Lovecraft’s far too prominent racism. As much as I…

Chasm City (2001) – Alastair Reynolds

Alastair Reynolds next science fiction novel, Chasm City, takes place in the same universe as Revelation Space but is not a sequel, instead we are given a future noir tale of revenge, and the human ability to commit good and horrible acts, redemption, and discovery. We visit a couple of planets that were mentioned in…

Evolution (2001) – Ivan Reitman

The next title to be featured in the Dragons & Dinosaurs chapter of DK Canada’s immensely entertaining Monsters in the Movies is the science fiction comedy, Evolution. Starring David Duchovny, Orlando Jones, and Julianne Moore, Reitman’s underdog scientists not only have to take on the government in the form of Ted Levine’s General Woodman, but…

Revelation Space (2000) – Alastair Reynolds

Growing up I loved science fiction movies and television (still do) but as far as reading went I stuck to Star Wars and Star Trek novels before finally letting Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001, and Frank Herbert’s Dune open my mind up a little more. Still, I wouldn’t delve much deeper than that for a number…

Galaxy Quest (1999) – 20th Anniversary Blu-Ray

Somehow, the now iconic science fiction comedy Galaxy Quest is turning twenty this year. That doesn’t seem possible. It’s as if someone enhanced the Omega 13 and shot us forward in time rather than in reverse. You see, I remember seeing it in the theater, laughing aloud at the realization that these filmmakers, these actors,…