Mission: Impossible (1966) – Elena, and The Short Tail Spy

IMF agent, Rollin Hand (Martin Landau) gets to fly solo in this mission, that sees him investigating the titular Elana, played by BarBara Luna in this episode that was written by Ellis Marcus and first aired on 10 December, 1966. Dan (Steven Hill) selects Rollin and a psychiatrist, Carlos Enero (Barry Atwater) to travel to…

Toronto After Dark 2019: The Assent (2019) – Pearry Teo

There’s a Barker/Lovecraftian feel to the gritty dirtiness of this entry in the Toronto After Dark film festival. Couched in a house covered in unnerving art, and filled with troubling apparitions and visions there is an aggressive edge to The Assent in the way it is shot, and the way the story unfolds. Mostly. Halfway…

The Twilight Zone (1963) – The Parallel, and I Dream of Genie

Paramount Pictures pulls me further into the fourth season of The Twilight Zone as I continue my journey through The Complete Series on blu-ray. First up this week is The Parallel. Written by series creator Rod Serling, with an airdate of 14 March, 1963 the story follows Robert Gaines (Steve Forrest), who returns to Earth…

Spellbound (1945) – Alfred Hitchcock

A film starring Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck directed by Alfred Hitchcock can’t be anything but a winner, and is my next stop on the What Else to Watch list from DK Canada’s The Movie Book following their recommendation of the title, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. The ever-appealing Bergman plays psychiatrist, Dr. Constance Petersen,…

Quantum Leap (1991) – Dreams and A Single Drop of Rain

Deborah Pratt writes the first episode up for review this week, Dreams. It aired on 13 November, 1991, and finds Sam (Scott Bakula) on 28 February, 1979. Sam has leaped into a police detective, Jack Stone, who is working a murder case, but is also suffering from some terrible flashbacks. These trace memories are throwing…

Batman Forever (1995) – Joel Schumacher

  As I continue my time with the Dark Knight via the Sci-Fi Chronicles book, I think it was after Batman Returns that someone at Warner Brothers wanted to get away from the darker, more adult ideas Tim Burton’s films were starting to introduce and perhaps push the series in a more ‘family-friendly’ way. Enter…