Day The World Ended (1955) – Roger Corman

Atomic Mutations is the next chapter in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies, and the first one I chose to dive into is a Roger Corman film from the mid-50s. Nuclear war has happened, and seven survivors have holed up in a remote home, safely enclosed in a protected valley. Jim Maddison (Paul Birch) and…

Star Trek: Enterprise (2004) – Proving Ground, and Stratagem

Captain’s log: 6 December, 2153 Chris Black pens this episode that first aired on 21 January, 2004. It sees an Andorian ship, commanded by Shran (Jeffrey Combs) arriving unexpectedly in the Delphic Expanse in an effort to help Archer (Scott Bakula) and the Enterprise find the Xindi weapon. As surprised and delighted to see Shran…

From Russia With Love (1957) – Ian Fleming

This week I dove into Ian Fleming’s fifth James Bond novel, and the one that was most closely adapted for the big screen, though SPECTRE is slipped into the film version, whereas in this tale it is simply east versus west as SMERSH, the Russian spy organisation comes up with a plan to humiliate the…

Robot Monster (1953) – Phil Tucker

DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies book, by director John Landis brings me a 50s title that is so bad, it’s come around to good, passed that and slapped it for being out too late and travelled back to bad again. It’s also become iconic, in that the monstrous ape, the chapter I am currently…

Star Trek: Enterprise (2002) – Shockwave Part II, and Carbon Creek

Captain’s log: February, 2152 Rick Berman and Brannon Braga pen the season two opener of Enterprise, which resolves the Shockwave cliffhanger. The season debuted on 18 September, 2002. While Captain Archer (Scott Bakula) is seemingly marooned in the 31st century with Daniels (Matt Winston), the crew of the Enterprise is taken prisoner by the Suliban….

Revelation Space (2000) – Alastair Reynolds

Growing up I loved science fiction movies and television (still do) but as far as reading went I stuck to Star Wars and Star Trek novels before finally letting Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001, and Frank Herbert’s Dune open my mind up a little more. Still, I wouldn’t delve much deeper than that for a number…