Road to Bali (1952) – Hal Walker

The comedic entries continue in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies book as I delve into one of the iconic Road movies of Bing Crosby and Bob Hope, co-starring Dorothy Lamour. When George (Crosby) and Harold (Hope) end up unemployed in their chosen art, show-biz, (because of some fraternisation with a couple of local sheilas)…

Dizzy Detectives (1943) – Jules White

I have always enjoyed the Three Stooges shorts. There’s not a time in my memory when they didn’t make me laugh out loud. I can remember Sunday mornings spent watching the marathon on television, or going to the base theatre in Borden to watch collections growing up. So when I saw that they were the…

Never Give A Sucker An Even Break (1941) – Edward F. Cline

DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies continues to make a monkey out of me with their chapter on monstrous apes as it doles out another comedic entry. That being said, I’m not a W.C. Fields fan. His character is always the same, and is extremely unlikable as far as I’m concerned. He’s an alcoholic, and…

Keep ‘Em Flying (1941) – Arthur Lubin and Ralph Ceder

The next title in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies features that great comedic duo, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. They make an appearance in the chapter on Monstrous Apes, as Abbott encounters a gorilla (a man in a suit) partway through this rather patriotic picture. The pair serve as ground crew to Jinx Roberts…

The Chimp (1932) – James Parrott

Dk Canada’s oh so enjoyable Monsters in the Movies dabbles with a bit of comedy as I delve deeper into the chapter on Monstrous Apes. For today’s entry I got to enjoy some comedic gold from Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy as they take some work in a circus and find themselves babysitting Ethel the…

Killer Ape (1953) – Spencer Gordon Bennet

I knew that they all can’t be winners, but this one was scrape off the bottom of your shoe bad. Killer Ape with one time Tarzan, Johnny Weismuller as Jungle Jim is the next film in DK Canada’s always enjoyable Monsters in the Movies book. This entry, in the chapter on monstrous apes, was just…

The Jungle Captive (1945) -Harold Young

The next title in DK Canada’s brilliantly enjoyable Monsters in the Movies, is a sequel to the last film I watched from the book, Captive Wild Woman. Once again a mad scientist, Stendahl (Otto Kruger) experiments on a monstrous ape (the name of the chapter I’m in, and supposedly is the same creature from Captive…

Captive Wild Woman (1943) – Edward Dmytryk

John Carradine as a detached, and insane scientist, who somehow still gets work, an animal trainer who wants a shot at the big top, and a gorilla suit that becomes a beautiful women with strange powers over the animals of the circus. It’s all here in the next big title in DK Canada’s Monsters in…

The Ape Man (1943) – William Beaudine

Bela Lugosi headlines another titles in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies as I continue my journey through the chapter on Monstrous Apes. This unusual little film, barely running an hour, tells the tale of Dr. James Brewster (Lugosi), who has a problem. It seems through some study, and research, and experimentation he’s transformed himself,…

The Unholy Three (1930) – Jack Conway

The Unholy Three is an unusual entry in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies for a couple of reasons. It’s Lon Chaney’s only talking film, and the ape featured in the film (we are in the monstrous apes chapter after all) is only seen a couple of times, and isn’t really used for much but…

Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) – Robert Florey

Bela Lugosi, with the horrible addition of a unibrow, terrorises unsuspecting Paris in the next stop in the Monstrous Apes chapter of DK Canada’s brilliant Monsters in the Movies book. Based on the classic short story by Edgar Allen Poe, the tale focuses on an evolution obsessed mad scientist, Dr. Mirakle (Lugosi)  and the object…

Tarzan of the Apes (1918) – Scott Sidney

DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies moves on to Monstrous Apes now, so I expect to see variations on Tarzan and Kong a lot over the pages of this chapter, and I will be quite delighted to see variations of the classic stories I already know. This version of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ tale is new…