Willow (1988) – Ron Howard

I remember the first time I saw Willow. I know where I was, and I remember how it swept me up in its narrative. I knew I had to see it the moment it told me it was from the imagination of George Lucas. I knew who Ron Howard was, but I was a teenager…

TIFF 2021: Where is Anne Frank? dir. Ari Folman

Waltz with Bashir directot Ar Folman delivers a poignant animated feature, that touches on some important concepts, and ideas. Kitty is the imaginary friend that Anne Frank wrote to in her diary, pouring her thoughts and feelings, while documenting the events of her life, including two years of living in hiding from the Nazis during…

Shadow and Bone (2012) – Leigh Bardugo

My second foray into the Grishaverse was the first one written, Shadow and Bone. And much like Six of Crows, I got swept up pretty damned quick in the story and the characters, and can’t wait to continue to explore the rest of the realm that Bardugo created. In this novel, we are introduced to…

TIFF 2021: The Electrical Life of Louis Wain dir. Will Sharpe

If one could transmute joy and tears of a life, or transform a dew dropped ray of sunlight, into a film, then the result may very well be Will Sharpe’s biopic on English artist (you know his work, whether you recognize the name or not), Louis Wain (a fantastic turn by Benedict Cumberbatch). Sharpe’s tale…

Groundhog Day (1993) – Harold Ramis

Bill Murray headlines in one of my favourite comedies, Groundhog Day, which sees Murray as Phil Connors, a smarmy weatherman who thinks he’s better than his yearly assignment to head to Punxsutawney, for Phil the Groundhog’s yearly prediction on winter. He’s joined by his new producer, Rita (Andie MacDowell), and cameraman, Larry (Chris Elliott). Following…

The Day She Died (2021)- S.M. Freedman

Dundurn Press delivers S.M. Freedman’s thriller, The Day She Died, to my summer reading pile, and it is a gut punch of a book, exploring dark secrets, while exploring the concept of forgiveness of oneself. It’s a captivating read that pulls you in, and drags you along at full-throttle on a white knuckle ride that…

Against All Odds (1984) – Taylor Hackford

Jeff Bridges, Rachel Ward and James Woods star in this noir-esque film that fumbles visually, as far as I’m concerned. Everyone knows the hit song by Phil Collins that came out of this film, and honestly, when it’s used over the end credits that shows a crying and struggling to smile Ward, it’s got a…

The X-Files (1999) – Trevor, and Milagro

John Diehl guest stars in Trevor, an episode written by Jim Guttridge and Kenneth H. Hawryliw that first aired 11 April, 1999. Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) have an x-file on their hand when a convict, Pinker Rawls (Diehl) escapes from a prison camp during a tornado, after having killed the warden, by…

Predestination (2014) – Michael & Peter Spierig

Somehow this little sci-fi, time travel, paradox embracing film never hit my radar when it first came out. It would occasionally pop up in my recommended lists, and I would think yeah, I should check that out, and then promptly forget about it. But the wait was worth it, because when I finally did settle…

M*A*S*H (1976) – Smilin’ Jack, The More I See You, and Deluge

B.J. (Mike Farrell), Hawkeye (Alan Alda) and Potter (Harry Morgan) hane to ground a pilot, the titular Smililn’ Jack (Robert Hogan) in this episode penned by Simon Muntner and series developer Larry Gelbart, which first aired on 3 February, 1976. Smilin’ Jack is a helluva pilot, going for chopper pilot of the year, all he…