Whispers Under Ground (2012) – Ben Aaronovitch

The third book in what has become known as the Rivers of London series takes Peter Grant beneath London in the next volume of the urban fantasy series. Working a murder case, while still hunting down the Faceless Man and his students, Grant, alongside Lesley, who has now joined the Folly (where they work from)…

Moon Over Soho (2011) – Ben Aaronovitch

Constable Peter Grant returns to investigate the supernatural in the second novel in the Rivers of London series written by Ben Aaronovitch. Picking up about six months after the first book, the novel sees Grant still dealing with the fallout from the events of the first novel, particularly the attack that left his friend, and…

A Darker Shade of Magic (2015) – V.E. Schwab

I dug excitedly into V.E. Schwab’s A Darker Side of Magic, I’d heard good things about it, and I like the idea of connected worlds, all sharing a city called London, one filled with magic, one destroyed by it, one fading, and one without any idea of magic (the closest to our own), and those…

Rivers of London (2011) – Ben Aaronovitch

Rivers of London, originally released as Midnight Riot before it was retitled to launch the continuing series of novels it spawned, was a wonderful surprise and a complete joy to read, and a fantastic introduction into the genre of urban fantasy. PC Peter Grant is afraid he’s going to end up doing administrative duty once…

Doomsday (2008) – Neil Marshall

Writer/director Neil Marshall pays homage to Snake Plissken and Mad Max with his actioner, Doomsday, which, as I rewatched it, had an opening that seems incredibly relevant as a pandemic sweeps the UK, and as the virus spreads there are lockdowns, quarantines, and curfews – until the infected are all locked away in Scotland, a…

Diamonds Are Forever (1956) – Ian Fleming

The fourth James Bond adventure by Ian Fleming is on my book shelf this week, and I dug into it eagerly. Despite some troubling moments of racism, 007’s literary adventure in this book is damned enjoyable, and you can see a number of themes and locales survived the jump to the big screen with Sean…

Moonraker (1979) – Lewis Gilbert

Oh Moonraker. Sigh. When I was first getting into Bond films, at the age of twelve, I thought Moonraker was great – I didn’t see it during its original release in ’79, but I remember seeing images, and some of the toys and cards – because space, and lasers, gadgets and James Bond! Coming to…

Moonraker (1955) – Ian Fleming

James Bond is back… On the book shelf. This week, I dig into the third of Ian Fleming’s novels about secret agent 007, license to kill and reveled in the rapid fire pace of the story while being surprised at how confined the story is, while still allowing the plan at the heart of the…

The Giant Behemoth (1959) – Douglas Hickox and Eugene Lourie

The English are in trouble again as I venture into the water to discover another title in the Dragons & Dinosaurs chapter of DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies. This time all of our atomic testing has caused a mass of radioactive waste to wash ashore near a small English village, and that’s only the…

Gorgo (1961) – Eugene Lourie

What would happen if England got in on the Godzilla craze? Well, I found out as I explored DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies book and came across Gorgo as I continue to explore the chapters on dragons and dinosaurs. When a group of sailors capture a strange beast off the coast of Ireland and…

28 Weeks Later (2007) – Juan Carlos Fresnadillo

The zombie madness continues as I work my way through the chapter on this vicious version of the undead in DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies. Much like the first film, 28 Days Later, this film is violent, kinetic, and features some solid star power. The rage virus has swept across the UK, but a…

Indiana Jones and the White Witch (1994) – Martin Caidin

London 1930 The adventures of Indiana Jones continue with Martin Caidin’s second novel featuring the heroic archaeologist. Coming on the tails of the previous book, Indiana Jones and the Sky Pirates, this story shows that Caidin is more comfortable with the the set pieces that pop up in the iconic series, but it still seems…