Hard Boiled (1992) – John Woo

The Directory, filling out the last section of DK Canada’s marvellous The Movie Book, brings me a 90s action classic. One that set the standard for Honk Kong cinema, and found fans all over the world with its style of balletic violence, beautifully crafted shots, and fantastic set pieces. Not to mention, the exemplary Chow…

Jules et Jim (1962) – Francois Truffaut

The Directory, the final part of DK Canada’s The Movie Book continues to bring me exemplary films to expand my cinematic education, and today it brings me a classic Truffaut film. Adapting the novel of the same name by Henri-Pierre Rochem, Truffaut serves not only as director but writer and producer as well. The film…

Meshes of the Afternoon (1943) – Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid

As I explore the final pages of DK Canada’s immensely informative The Movie Book, I’ve moved into the last section of this catalogue of films. Herein lies another title from The Directory, a selection of titles that are exceptional but didn’t make the cut for the main body of the text. Meshes of the Afternoon…

Un Chien Andalou (1929) – Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali

The Directory in DK Canada’s The Movie Book is going to provide me with a number of films I’ve never seen, or a chance to revisit old friends. Having said that I’m not sure where Un Chien Andalou fits. True I had never seen the entire short, running twenty-one minutes, but I feel that everyone…

The White Ribbon (2009) – Micheal Haneke

I’m finishing up the main body of DK Canada’s exceptional The Movie Book, and Haneke’s The White Ribbon is a fantastic film to wrap up the main section of the book. Set a few short years before the First World War, this Golden Globe winning film is a somber, thoughtful affair on sins, youth, tradition,…

Gertie the Dinosaur (1915) – Winsor McCay

I move into another chapter in DK Canada’s immensely enjoyable Monsters in the Movies book from director John Landis. I leave behind Myths, Legends and Fairy Tales and move on to Dragons & Dinosaurs. And first up is one of the earliest examples of animation, Gertie the Dinosaur. This silent short film was originally created…

Ghostbusters (1984) – Ivan Reitman

A chapter on ghosts in the cinema, as illustrated by DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies, would be remiss without covering the 80s comedy classic, Ghostbusters, starring Bill Murray, Dan Akroyd, Harold Ramis, Ernie Hudson, Sigourney Weaver, and Rick Moranis. I remember when I first heard about this movie, first heard the classic song, saw…

The Sweet Hereafter (1997) – Atom Egoyan

Atom Egoyan’s heartbreaking, and powerful film (something I was fortunate enough to be able to tell the director in person) is the next stop in DK Canada’s The Movie Book. Based on the novel by Russell Banks, which Egoyan adapted as well as directed the film features great performances by Ian Holm, Sarah Polley, Bruce…

The Shawshank Redemption (1994) – Frank Darabont

If there is a near perfect drama film for me, it is the next recommendation in DK Canada’s The Movie Book, The Shawshank Redemption directed by Frank Darabont, who wrote the screenplay as well, basing it on the short story by Stephen King. Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman headline at the iconic King-universe prison, Shawshank,…

Ju Dou (1990) – Yimou Zhang and Fengliang Yang

The beautiful, romantic and tragic Ju Dou is the next title on the What Else to Watch list as I continue to work my way through the immensely enjoyable The Movie Book from DK Canada. Following my screening of Raise the Red Lantern, this was one of the book’s recommendations. Starring Li Gong as the…

The Shark is Still Working (2007) -Erik Hollander

Oh Jaws. There’s never not a good time for me to watch this movie, so I was delighted when it showed up in DK Canada’s The Movie Book. But having reviewed it for the blog previous to this I moved onto the What Else to Watch list, and there were only a couple of titles…

The Battle of Algiers (1966) – Gillo Pontecorvo

The next big title in DK Canada’s The Movie Book is a film that, perhaps, resonates with even more importance now than it did when it was first released. Pontecorvo’s The Battle of Algiers is a fascinating, brutal, and dark watch that shows us the true face of war and it’s effect on all sides…