The French Connection (1971) – William Friedkin

William Friedkin’s 1971 classic has deserved a rewatch for awhile, and I was quite happy to settle in for it. I like Gene Hackman, who won himself an Academy Award for his turn as NYPD officer Popeye Doyle, and I’m a huge fan of Roy Scheider who plays his partner, Cloudy, and received a nomination…

Never Give A Sucker An Even Break (1941) – Edward F. Cline

DK Canada’s Monsters in the Movies continues to make a monkey out of me with their chapter on monstrous apes as it doles out another comedic entry. That being said, I’m not a W.C. Fields fan. His character is always the same, and is extremely unlikable as far as I’m concerned. He’s an alcoholic, and…

The Girl Can’t Help It (1956) – Frank Tashlin

The first recommendation following my screening of Jailhouse Rock for the Great Movies – 100 Years of Film is the very enjoyable The Girl Can’t Help It starring the stunning Jayne Mansfield. The film follows an alcoholic PR man, Tom Miller (Tom Ewell) who used to the top of his game, and could find the…

Broken Blossoms (1919) – D.W. Griffith

I continue to explore some of the key works of D.W. Griffith with DK Book’s The Movie Book, and this time I dive into a fascinating tale that is perhaps best told through the silent format that marked Griffith’s time. Be warned there is a lot of racism in this film. It’s in the title….

The Day of the Triffids (1963) – Steven Sekely 

  The Sci-Fi Chronicles brings me yet another film I’ve never seen, and yet feel I know, because it shows up everywhere, The Day of the Triffids. based on the classic science fiction tale by John Wyndham. This adaptation fairly mangles the original novel, tagging on a Hollywood Happy ending, or as happy as a…

The Rockford Files (1976) – The Family Hour & Feeding Frenzy

  This week private investigator Jim Rockford (James Garner)gets mixed up in some serious trouble, and it’s up to his quick wits, and friends to keep him out of jail… First up is The Family Hour, which aired October 8, 1976, and was written by Gordon T. Dawson. The phone gag is from a friend…

Blazing Saddles (1974) – Mel Brooks

  The Great Movies – 100 Years of Film book ‘s next recommendation for Monsieur Hulot, is Mel Brook’s comedic take on the western genre, that works on sight gags, physical comedy, and lots of great lines. However, there is also a slew of stereotypes and some less than acceptable language, although it’s very evident…